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+44 (0)1865 522412    james@jamesminter.com

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By James Minter, Sep 3 2018 09:09AM


Any author going down the self-publishing road needs all the help they can get. There is a heap of information out there on the internet, but what Ms Inglis has done is make an excellent attempt at bringing it all together into a single place. By doing so this she’s made the information more accessible, as well as presenting it in a logically structured style – you only need to read the Table Of Contents to see that. Moreover, it is massively sourced with her hard-won knowledge and experience gained by going through the process with her books. That’s why I love “How to…” books. They capture hard-won knowledge and experience and make it available in an easily consumable form so saving you making the same mistakes, wasting time, money, or going off tangent.


Self-publishing and book marketing are significant, evolving processes, and a guide such as this cannot be complete or entirely up to date. As with all eBooks, it can be continuously corrected, amended, or added to. Ms Inglis makes good use of live links, and a password-protected resources page on her website to allow the reader to explore the software products and tools she discusses.


In conclusion, this is a book well worth purchasing for potential, new, and existing authors. For the price of your morning coffee and pastry, you gain the knowledge and expertise of successful children’s author who speaks from the heart and shares not only her successes but things that didn’t work out so well. And, that takes courage but gives the book huge credibility.



By James Minter, Apr 28 2017 09:24AM

Self-publishing is now a very accepted way to bring your novel to market – even the most successful authors like JK Rowling are using this approach. However, writing a novel to the standards demanded by readers is, in many writers minds, the biggest and principle issue they face. As a self-published author of twelve books, believe me when I say that writing an attention-grabbing story, though significant, is only one step to becoming a successful author. The demands of the self-publishing process are high, complex, time-consuming, frustrating, bewildering and at times, make you question is it all worth it.

Any author going down the self-publishing road needs all the help they can get. As V.V Cam says in her introduction, there is a heap of information out there on the internet, but what she has done is make a good attempt at bringing it all together into a single place. By doing so this she’s made the information more accessible, as well as presenting it in a logically structured style – you only need to read the Table Of Contents to see that. Moreover, it is heavily spread with her own hard-won knowledge and experience gained by going through the process with her husband’s book. That’s why I love “How to…” books. They capture hard-won knowledge and experience and make it available in an easily consumable form so saving you making the same mistakes or going off tangent.

People write for many reasons, but not everyone attempts to publish their work. A useful device V.V Cam employs throughout the book is self-assessment questionnaires. In chapter two she offers one appropriate to answer the question – is self-publishing right for you. I recommend you complete this since you will better understand why your writing and if you’ve the time/tenacity/money to bring you book to the general public.

Self-publishing is a big, evolving process, and a guide such as this cannot be complete or totally up to date. As with all eBooks, it can constantly be corrected, amended, or added to. V.V Cam makes a good use of live links to allow the reader to explore some of the software products and tools she mentions.

I’m a visual person, and for me, I would like to have seen a diagram covering the whole process. That way each chapter could reference the diagram as the book unfolds so you can monitor your progress. By its very nature the publishing steps are interrelated, and on a few occasions reference is made to an item like ISBN’s or Tax Identification Number but not discussed until much later. Also, some recommendations like grabbing your Author page on Goodreads and Amazon were weak suggestions rather than being presented as a must do. Additionally, I felt chapters 6, 7, and 8 were rushed/sketchy and needed more attention.

In conclusion, a book worth purchasing but there are gaps, but in fairness writing the definitive guide would be near on impossible.



By James Minter, Jan 9 2017 11:49AM

I really like this Author and what he has to say. He can be counted on to give great stories and examples of what needs to happen to become more creative. There are lots of learnings, and I feel he’s really on my side, and perhaps even understands me a bit!


It’s always reassuring to be given examples of how others who have come before, have struggled with the same issues I have, and it inspires me to become better than I perhaps thought I am.


This is book 3 from Collins on the Power of Creative, and it contains many nuggets of information. However, I feel he does himself an injustice since they should be pointed out to the reader, not simply embedded inside paragraphs. I believe this book would have more impact with better formatting. Having said that, it is still well worth the read.


The author provided me with a copy of the book for the purposes of reviewing it.

By James Minter, Aug 17 2016 01:18PM

I am a father to two children and stepfather to three more. They are all responsible adults now and successful in their relationships and chosen careers. But watching them grow opened my generational eyes to the issues and problems they faced, the decisions they’ve made, and opportunities they’ve taken. Of course, as a parent, I always wanted to share my wisdom with my children, and offer my input when they wrestled with difficult issues. However, facing the parental dilemma of getting the balance right between giving an opinion versus interfering, led me to consider what I, or other parents, could do better to equip children for adulthood.


With hindsight, what I should have done was consciously provide them with the means to make informed, more appropriate, and more realistic decisions. This is a big task. Nevertheless, since a person’s values underly their thought processes and how they react, and respond, to situations and information, it occurred to me that if parents focus on the development of positive values at an early age, this would be a great place to start.


Combined with the fact I am a fiction author, and I know how positively children respond to stories, it seemed to me a traditional story book was the right vehicle to share my ideas.

Such an approach was too late for my children, but since there are plenty of new parents out there who could benefit, I was motivated to write the Billy Learns About series of books. Combined with the fact I am a fiction author, and I know how positively children respond to stories, it seemed to me a traditional story book was the right vehicle to share my ideas. In addition, I am fortunate to have a great resource to call on—my wife, Maggie, a personal and business development coach, an NLP practitioner and hypnotherapist—making me ideally placed to bring these differing factors together into a series of children’s books which focus on developing positive values.


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